25 May 2024
10 'funny' idioms in English 0

10 'funny' idioms in English 0

Vietnamese young people often say `cool as a gecko`, but in English, people use the phrase `cool as a cucumber`.

The word `cool` doesn’t just mean `cool` to talk about the weather.

The word `cool` doesn’t just mean `cool` to talk about the weather.

10 'funny' idioms in English

The origin of this idiom comes from ancient times when people traveled by horse-drawn carriages.

The origin of this idiom comes from ancient times when people traveled by horse-drawn carriages.

10 'funny' idioms in English

Why does `kick the bucket` refer to death?

Why does `kick the bucket` refer to death?

10 'funny' idioms in English

When a person is tired or exhausted, their face is often described as `bluish`.

When a person is tired or exhausted, their face is often described as `bluish`.

10 'funny' idioms in English

`Storm in a Cup` creates the feeling of a weather rage but the scale is very small.

`Storm in a Cup` creates the feeling of a weather rage but the scale is very small.

10 'funny' idioms in English

`Bob’s your uncle` is intended to describe a simple, easy-to-understand event that everyone can understand, for example, `left over right; right over left, and Bob’s your uncle`.

The origin of this saying comes from Great Britain and colonial countries.

`Bob’s your uncle` is intended to describe a simple, easy-to-understand event that everyone can understand, for example, `left over right; right over left, and Bob’s your uncle`.

The origin of this saying comes from Great Britain and colonial countries.

10 'funny' idioms in English

Similar to when Vietnamese people say `head in the clouds`, English people have an identical saying `head in the clouds` to describe a person with unrealistic, unrealistic thoughts.

Similar to when Vietnamese people say `head in the clouds`, English people have an identical saying `head in the clouds` to describe a person with unrealistic, unrealistic thoughts.

10 'funny' idioms in English

Surely when a person – no matter what language – is too scared, too nervous or shocked, they feel like their heart is jumping somewhere.

Surely when a person – no matter what language – is too scared, too nervous or shocked, they feel like their heart is jumping somewhere.

10 'funny' idioms in English

This idiom was first used  in a poem by the 15th century English poet William Langland.

This idiom was first used  in a poem by the 15th century English poet William Langland.

10 'funny' idioms in English

There’s nothing easier than eating candy or cake.

There’s nothing easier than eating candy or cake.

Peace

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *